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Allopurinol Injuries and Lawsuit

Have you suffered from Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), epidermal necrolysis (TENS) or some other serious injury as a result of taking allopurinol? If this is the case, the best thing you can do is to consult a personal injury attorney and discuss your case with him or her. You may be able to get compensation for your allopurinol injury.

Allopurinol is a drug that is referred to as a xanthine oxidase inhibitor. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor is any substance that inhibits the activity of xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase is an enzyme that is involved in purine metabolism. Purines are organic compounds in your body.

By inhibiting the activity of xanthine oxidase, allopurinol reduces the production of uric acid. As a result, allopurinol is used in the treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is a condition in which you have an excess amount of uric acid in your blood plasma.

What is Allopurinol used for?

Allopurinol is used to treat complications of hyperuricemia, which include chronic (long-term) gout. Gout is a disorder that is usually characterized by recurrent attacks of acute (short-term) inflammatory arthritis. There is controversy over the issue of whether allopurinol can actually make acute gout attacks worse initially, but it is considered to be useful in treating chronic gout in order to prevent future attacks.

Allopurinol is also used as an add-on drug in the treatment of refractory epilepsy. It can also lower blood pressure in mild hypertension (high blood pressure).

Allopurinol and FDA Approval

Allopurinol was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on August 19, 1966, under the trade name of Zyloprim. At that time, allopurinol was marketed by Burroughs-Wellcome. At the present time, allopurinol is a generic drug that is sold under a variety of brand names, which include Allohexal, Allosig, Milurit, Alloril, Progout, Zyloprim, Zyloric, Zyrik and Aluron.

In spite of the beneficial effects brought about by allopurinol, there are also adverse side effects that may result from taking the drug. In fact, allopurinol has rare but potentially fatal side effects that involve your skin. The most serious adverse side effect is a hypersensitivity syndrome that consists of fever, skin rash, hepatitis, worsened renal function, and, in some cases, allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome.

Allopurinol is commonly known to cause Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TENS), which are two life-threatening skin conditions. A more common side effect is a less serious rash that leads to the discontinuation of using the drug.

In addition, allopurinol can, in rare instances, result in depression of bone marrow elements, which causes cytopenias (reduction in the number of your blood cells), as well as aplastic anemia, a disease in which your bone marrow, and the blood stem cells residing there, are damaged. Peripheral neuritis and interstitial nephritis are also potential, rare side effects of allopurinol.

Once again, if you have suffered Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), epidermal necrolysis (TENS) or some other serious injury as a result of taking allopurinol, the best thing you can do is to consult a personal injury attorney and discuss your case with him or her. You may have compensation that is due you as a result of your allopurinol injury.